Living With Your Pet

Your pet relies on you everyday for its happiness, health, and well-being.

Your pet relies on you everyday for its happiness, health, and well-being. Brushing, bathing, nail and teeth care, and attention to your pet’s nutritional needs are important parts of daily pet care. And what do you do when you are thinking about taking your pet on a trip? Some pets travel better by car, whereas others travel better by air. Still other pets are better off remaining in familiar surroundings. In any case, advance planning and preparation are necessary when traveling with your pet. Want to know how to help your special companion in an emergency?

Here’s some practical advice: keep your veterinarian’s phone number handy with your other emergency numbers, just in case! Taking care of your pet is a job that last all year long. As the seasons change, preparations should always be made for the change in weather and climate.

Camping with Pets

Camping with pets presents its own challenges. Skunks, raccoons, porcupines, snakes, and other wildlife can bite or otherwise injure your pet. Keep your pet within sight and on a leash. Be considerate of other campers. Be sure to ask your veterinarian about flea, tick and heartworm prevention.

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First Aid

Of course, before an emergency ever arises, it’s a good idea to learn all you can about first aid techniques and pet health care. Never leave dangerous objects like pins, needles, or fish hooks within reach. Keep poisonous products and materials far from your pet’s reach as you would with a child.  Be well aware Read more…

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Grooming

Dogs Regular brushing, bathing, and nail care are essential. Protect your puppy’s eyes and ears when bathing, and don’t allow the puppy to become chilled after bathing. Your veterinarian may recommend that you do not bathe your puppy when it is younger than 10 to 12 weeks unless absolutely necessary (especially if your puppy is Read more…

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Help & Support

University of California at Davis Veterinary Students (530)752-3602 or toll free (800)565-1526 Monday-Friday 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm (PT) http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/petloss/index.htm Florida Community Volunteers (352)392-4700 Dial 1 and 4080 (352)392-4700 X4744 (Joy Diaz) Monday-Friday  7 pm to 9 pm (ET) http://www.vetmed.ufl.edu/vmth/companions.htm Michigan State University Veterinary Students (517)432-2696  Tuesday to Thursday 6:30 PM to 9:30 PM (ET) Read more…

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Mealtime

Puppies Feed a high quality diet designed for puppies. A wide variety of diets and formulations are available and your veterinarian should be your primary source of information as to the best choice for your puppy. The amount fed will vary with the type of food and the individual dog, but in general, should only Read more…

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Planning and Preparation

Planning and preparation are necessary when traveling with family pets. Consider whether your pet is comfortable when traveling. Some animals, like some people, function better in familiar surroundings. A car-sick animal can make a trip miserable for everyone. Some ill or physically impaired dogs and cats cannot withstand the rigors of travel. If this is Read more…

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Recognizing Illnesses

Only a healthy pet is a happy companion. Assuring your pet’s daily well-being requires regular care and close attention to any hint of ill health. The American Veterinary Medical Association therefore suggests that you consult your veterinarian if your pet shows any of the following signs: Abnormal discharges from the nose, eyes, or other body Read more…

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Seasonal Care

Heat Stroke Heatstroke may kill or seriously injure your pet – but it can easily be avoided. Never leave pets in cars on warm days; exercise during the cool part of the day; look for rapid breathing;loud panting; or staggering. Professional help may be needed, but in the meantime quickly get the animal to a Read more…

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The Decision

How Do I Make The Decision? Your relationship with your pet is special, and you are responsible for its care and welfare. Eventually, many owners are faced with making life or death decisions for their pets. Such a decision may become necessary for the welfare of the animal and for you and your family.  A Read more…

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The Next Step

How do I tell my family? Family members usually are already aware of a pet’s problems. However, you should review with them the information you have received from your veterinarian. Long-term medical care can be a burden that you and your family may be unable to bear emotionally or financially, and this should be discussed Read more…

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